Interbike 2013: KHS Bicycles

From the KHS Bicycles family comes the Manhattan Cruiser line. These beautiful classic styled bicycles will be available in both Men’s and Women’s (mixte) frames and various colors. I really dug the colors they had. I’m sure these will be a big hit.
Mahattan cruisers

Fender freaks, notice how these models have fenders! Check out the rack on this one. Best of all, both rack and fenders are color-matched to the frame.
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The KHS TR101 is ready for your bike commute! It’s got rack and fenders; all that’s missing is you, the rider.
KHS tr101

For you single speeders, the Flight 100 has been part of the KHS catalog for over 7 years. It remains a popular bike for them.
khs flite 100

Interbike 2013 Coverage Proudly Sponsored by Black Tiger Jerky
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Tips for choosing a good helmet

What makes a good helmet?
Everyone has a different budget when it comes to buying a cycle helmet. If you’re willing to cough up the extra coin then you can expect the helmets to become lighter, better ventilated or have a better adjustable retention system.

But never fear! You don’t have to spend a fortune to get something that will keep you safe. All helmets must conform to standards that guarantee a certain level of protection. The debate on whether helmets should be compulsory continues to rage on. No matter what side of the fence you’re on, it’s undeniable that you’re better protected in some circumstances when wearing a helmet. Have a read through this guide to get an idea of what you should be looking for.

Fit
You want your helmet to strike that perfect balance between snug and secure. It doesn’t want to be so tight that it’s pinching you around the face. Meanwhile, if the helmet is too loose and you get into a crash, your head will still be moving around inside it. So you don’t want that either. Don’t be afraid to go into a shop to try some on. After all, it’s vitally important to get one that’s comfortable and safe.

helmet_wear

Main/outer shell
The main shell of most helmets is made out of expanded polystyrene. This will absorb the force of an impact if you ever hit one of those inconspicuous pot-holes. The outer shell holds the inner shell together and will also help to disperse the shock of a crash.

Padding
Inside every helmet are pads and cloth that are designed to keep your head comfortable and absorb sweat on those more challenging rides. As you can probably guess, your helmet will not smell like a bed of roses after extensive use. You’ll want to ensure that the padding is removable so that it can be washed as necessary.


Straps and head retention system

The straps should be adjustable and easy to use so that you can keep the helmet in the correct position. The ‘Y’ piece straps will help you adjust the position of the helmet on each side of your head so that you can comfortably clip it all together at the chin strap.

The head retention system is an adjustable harness at the back of the helmet that improves stability by grabbing the occipital bone at the back of your head. They are usually controlled by a wheel at the back of the helmet that can turned either way to tighten or loosen your back support.

Ventilation
As you go up in price you can get varying levels of ventilation. Strategically placed vents are cut into the helmet so that your head can remain cool as you ride. If you find yourself becoming hot headed during a ride – and it’s not a result of road rage – then you may wish to get a well-ventilated helmet.

If you’re shopping online, you can get a lot of great deals on bicycle helmets from retailers like Koo Bikes. They also supply a number of bike accessories such as locks, lights and air pumps if you’re in the market for something new. One final tip before you buy a helmet online; make sure that the helmet size matches your own head measurement to guarantee a helmet that ticks all the boxes.

Interbike 2013: New Motiv Shadow E-Bike

Remember those Motiv e-bike spy photos we showed you a couple weeks ago? Well, we got to try the new Motiv Shadow out in person at the e-bike paddock just outside the Mandalay Bay Convention Center.

Motiv’s goal is to produce a pedal-assist e-bike that is a bit more stylish than other offerings, and we think they’ve succeeded — the Shadow takes many of its styling cues from the hot urban cycling market, including deep V wheels and color-matched decals, cable casings and other accessories.

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The Shadow will be available with the choice of three battery types: 36V, 36V Long Range, or a tire-smoking 48V. Those batteries are coupled to a rear hub 500 watt geared brushless motor. The bike was a blast around the paddock area!

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Motiv also had a dashing hot-pink e-cruiser for testing:
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Stay tuned for an upcoming detailed review of the Shadow; RL took delivery of a tester the other day and is enjoying zipping around the streets of SoCal as we speak!


Interbike 2013 Coverage Proudly Sponsored by Black Tiger Jerky
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We’d like to interrupt your Interbike Goodness with some Dip

Sorry to interject this article on you handsome and beautiful BikeCommuters.com readers. But I wanted to share a project I recently did over at our sister-site, MtnBikeRiders.com

I have given one of my mountain bikes a new moniker, Burt Reynolds. I’ve written a whole series of articles about his transformation and through out the months he’s gone through some major changes. I originally named him Burt Reynolds because the OEM paint scheme on the Redline D600 reminded me of the Trans Am in the movie Smokey and the Bandit. If you’ve been following us on Facebook or Twitter, you may have seen a status update that stated I was able to strip one of my bikes down to the frame in less than 8 minutes, well this is the frame that I was talking about.
Burt Reynolds
I used 1.5 cans of Plasti-Dip that I bought at my local Home Depot. Things didn’t turn out so well the first time around. I had to peel off the first 5 coats and start over. The end result is what you see below.
Plasti dip bicycle

You can read up on all the steps that I took to get it what you see above. What’s great about Plasti-Dip is that you can over spray it and to remove that excess, all you have to do is peel it off.

Interbike 2013: Straight from the oddball files…

Interbike is always full of creativity, technological wonder, and a good bit of wackiness. This next product falls squarely into the latter camp. Meet the Spruzza:

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Spruzza (meaning “spray” or “mist” in Italian, depending who you ask) is basically a stem-mounted squirt gun that’s pointed at the rider. In theory, periodically spritzing yourself with this device helps keep you cooler on hot rides. Who doesn’t like the sound of staying cool on a sweltering day?

Got to hand it to the Spruzza folks — yes, this thing is nuts…but it is a creative solution nonetheless, and that is often how real advances occur in the cycling world. Another thumbs-up to their “guerrilla marketing” strategy; as Interbike show space is tremendously expensive, the Spruzza marketer just brought a big display box with him and buttonhooked people in the aisles for demonstrations. No floor space or expensive booth trappings required!

The Spruzza appears to come in enough colors to match almost any bike, and it only weighs about 200g. As ridiculous as many of you (and we) think this device may be, credit must go to Spruzza for making it about as stylish as possible…carbon-look plastics and colorful inserts:

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What do you think? Is this the next “killer component” that the cycling world has been waiting for?


Interbike 2013 Coverage Proudly Sponsored by Black Tiger Jerky
Black Tiger Jerky